Exploring Mount Wellington

This weekend’s adventure took us up on to my favourite feature of the Hobart skyline, Mount Wellington. The mountain is covered in hiking trails, and we did a loop which included three trails and covered about 8km.

We started at the Chalet (a very grandiosely named lovely, but simple mountain hut), headed along the Organ Pipes Track in front of what has to be one of the most recognisable features of the mountain, up the Zig Zag Track to the Pinnacle, down part of Pinnacle Road, on to the Panorama track, and then back down some more of Pinnacle Road to find our car at the Chalet.

It was a glorious Tasmanian autumn day with temperatures on the mountain ranging between 0 and 3 degrees Celsius, but feeling much colder whenever the wind gusted past. The start of our walk even featured light snow. Like I said, autumn in Tasmania.

As always, the hike was spectacular – ranging through bushland, over rocky terrain and rewarding us with stunning views throughout. I love that this amazing place is right on our doorstep.

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The Chalet, Mount Wellington, Tasmania
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View from the Organ Pipes Track, Mount Wellington
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The Organ Pipes, Mount Wellington
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Climbers’ access route onto the Organ Pipes, Mount Wellington
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The Organ Pipes, Mount Wellington
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Trail signs and a poor lost sock on Mount Wellington
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View from the Zig Zag Track, Mount Wellington
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View from the Zig Zag Track, Mount Wellington
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View from the Zig Zag Track, Mount Wellington
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The Zig Zag Track, Mount Wellington
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View from the Zig Zag Track, Mount Wellington
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The Zig Zag Track to the Pinnacle, Mount Wellington
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The final stretch of the Zig Zag Track to the Pinnacle, Mount Wellington
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The Panorama Track, Mount Wellington
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View from the Panorama Track, Mount Wellington

Foodie adventures at the Taste of the Huon

This weekend’s adventure took us to the Taste of the Huon festival. The festival is focused on food, wine, entertainment, arts and crafts from the Huon Valley, D’entrecasteaux Channel and Bruny Island regions of Tasmania (which all lie just south of Hobart). We lived in the D’entrecasteaux Channel region during our last stint in Tassie and it’s still where my heart is, even though this time around the place we call home is much closer to town.

Obviously there was no shortage of lovely food to try, but our highlights were:

  • Manuka and Blackberry/Clover Mead from the Mountain View Meadery.
  • Kentish Cherry Jam from Sleeping Beauty’s Pantry (the reference is to the mountain known locally as Sleeping Beauty rather than the fairytale character).
  • Fish sausage hotdogs from Silver Hill Fisch
  • And all the tarts from Bakery on Huntingfield (who sadly don’t appear to have a website).

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A weekend at Woolmers

Recently we spent a weekend at the historic Woolmers Estate in Longford, staying in one of the converted workers’ cottages.

Woolmers was a large pastoral property which was occupied by the Archer family from the early 1800s to the mid-1990s, a long stretch by Australian standards. In its early days it and neighbouring estate, Brickendon (owned by another branch of the Archer family), were staffed by the second largest number of assigned convicts in the Colony, peaking at 107 convicts between the two estates in 1833.

The property was opened as a museum in 1995, following the death of Thomas William Archer VI the previous year, and in 2010 it and Brickendon were jointly listed as  one of the eleven sites that make up the Australian Convict Sites World Heritage Property.

Having been reduced in size significantly over it’s lifetime, the current estate is spread out over 13 hectares which houses the main homestead, a kitchen and servant’s quarters, a provisions store, bakers cottages, various farm buildings, and a number of former workers’ cottages which have been converted into accomodation. It’s also home to an extensive rose garden which contains examples of all of the recognised rose families, ranging from the earliest European and China roses through to the roses of the twenty first century.

It’s funny to think that at in its heyday, the property would have been a village in itself, housing up to 100 people at any one time.

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